Tag Archives: cinnamon

Recipe: Citrus-Spiced Braised Red Cabbage

24 Jan

I love cabbage, that most humble of vegetables. Humble it may be, but versatile, too–and good for you, especially the red kind. With its lovely jewel tones (from a type of pigment also found in flower petals and fruits), red cabbage adds a beautiful touch of color to any meal.

This braised red cabbage is tangy and slightly sweet, featuring fresh orange juice, red wine, and  balsamic vinegar, as well as cinnamon, cloves, and caraway seed. It is a very nice accompaniment to pork or sausages, or a Thanksgiving meal–and also adds bit of zing to sandwiches. And if you are like me, you may also find yourself eating it cold, just because.


Citrus-Spiced Braised Red Cabbage

2 tbsp. olive oil
1 lg. onion, cut in half through the ends, then sliced into thin strips
3 cloves garlic, minced
1/2 tsp. caraway seeds
1/2 tsp. ground cinnamon
1/8 tsp. ground cloves
2 lb. red cabbage, any bruised outer leaves removed, cored, and sliced into strips (about 10 c.)
ground black pepper
1 c. vegetable broth
juice of one orange
3 tbsp. red wine
2 tbsp. balsamic vinegar

Preparation
1. Heat a large, heavy-bottom pot over medium-high heat and add the oil. When hot, add the onions and cook until soft and translucent. Add the garlic and spices and cook for a few more minutes, stirring frequently.
2. Add the cabbage and mix well to coat with garlic and spices. Continue cooking until the cabbage has wilted, then sprinkle with black pepper to taste, and add the broth and orange juice. With the heat on medium high, cook the cabbage for about 15 minutes, or until the liquid has reduced by at least half.
3. Add the wine and vinegar, and cook another 15 minutes. There should be some liquid at the bottom of the pot–but the cabbage should not be soupy. Turn up the heat if needed to allow any excess liquid to evaporate.
4. Serve immediately with a slotted spoon.

Recipe: Oatmeal Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough Ice Cream

12 Aug

I love ice cream and adore oatmeal chocolate chip cookies. And when temperatures soar, I think of cool things to eat. So what could be better than cinnamon ice cream with chunks of oatmeal chocolate chip cookie dough on a hot summer day? Not much. (Though I confess I’d eat this on a cold winter day, too.)

There are no eggs in the cookie dough (hence, it is quite safe to eat, meaning some of it may not make it into the ice cream). And since homemade ice cream doesn’t contain stabilizers, this is one dessert to eat immediately upon serving; if you are like me, you will not need any coaxing on that front…. It also does not last as long in the freezer as regular ice cream does (homemade ice cream tends to get icy after a few days), so you will have no choice but to eat this in a timely manner.

Final note: it’s important to freeze the ice cream for a while after you make it (as opposed to eating it immediately).The ice cream maker can get it most of the way there, but this will need some finishing time to get as firm as commercial ice cream. Having said that, feel free to ignore this advice if you like a soft-serve consistency (or are desperate to taste your creation).

Oatmeal Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough Ice Cream
Makes about 1 quart

Ice Cream
2 eggs
1/4 c. brown sugar
1/2 c. white sugar
2 c. heavy cream
1 c. whole milk
1 tbsp. vanilla
1 tbsp. ground cinnamon

Cookie Dough
1/3 c. all-purpose flour
2.5 tbsp. whole-wheat flour
1/3 c. quick oats
1/4 tsp. salt
1/3 c. brown sugar
2 tbsp. canola oil
2 tbsp. milk
1 tsp. vanilla
1/4  c. mini chocolate chips

Preparation

1. Whisk eggs for 1-2 minutes until light and creamy. Add about 1/3  of the sugar, whisk well, and repeat until all sugar has been incorporated.
2. Add cream and milk, then add vanilla and cinnamon and stir to combine.
3. Prepare ice cream in ice cream maker according to the manufacturer’s directions.
4. When ice cream is done, quickly fold in Cookie Dough mixture, and place in freezer-proof container. Cover container and freeze for at least two hours before serving.

Recipe: Mexican Chocolate Cake with Chocolate Glaze

8 Jan

There are some recipes you turn to again and again because they are deeply satisfying. This is one of them — a dark, rich chocolate Bundt cake heightened with hints of coffee and cinnamon. It is a frequently requested birthday cake at our house, made most recently for my son’s 21st birthday this week — with the addition of some Espresso Chip ice cream to complement the flavor.

Mexican Chocolate Cake with Chocolate Glaze

Cake
3 c. all purpose flour
1 1/2 c. sugar
1 tsp. salt
2 tsp. baking soda
4 tsp.  cinnamon
1/2 c. cocoa powder
3 tsp. vanilla extract
2/3 c. canola oil
2 tbsp. white distilled vinegar
2 c. coffee at room temperature  (or warm water mixed with 1-2 tbsp. instant espresso powder)
1-2 c. chocolate chips (preferably dark chocolate, if available)

Glaze
3/4 c. chocolate chips
3 tbsp. non-hydrogenated buttery spread such as Earth Balance/Smart Balance
1 tbsp. light corn syrup
1/4 tsp. vanilla

Preparation

Cake
1. Preheat oven to 350°.  Generously grease (with vegetable shortening) and lightly flour a Bundt pan.
2. Mix dry ingredients in a bowl until thoroughly combined. Make a well in the center, and add wet ingredients. Stir until just combined, and fold in chocolate chips.
3. Pour into prepared pan and bake for 40-50 minutes, or until skewer inserted into cake comes out clean; be careful not to overbake.
4. Cool for about 20 minutes, then turn out onto plate or serving platter. Cool completely and top with Chocolate Glaze.

Glaze
1. Melt first three ingredients on low power in microwave, stir until smooth, add vanilla, and drizzle over cake.

Adapted from The Joy of Vegan Baking, by Colleen Patrick-Goudreau.

Recipe: Cinnamon Chip Scones

11 Nov

One of our sons works at an eatery near his university that is known for its cinnamon chip scones.  Those scones are fantastic, but deadly; I looked up the nutritional content once and had to repress the memory (and steer clear of the scones). But then, when I was in the grocery store recently, I spotted a bag of cinnamon baking chips and succumbed to the temptation–though I vowed to make a batch of scones I would feel slightly better about eating and serving.

These are the result. They are by no means a health food, but since they are made with skim milk and a bit of whole wheat flour, perhaps they are just a tiny, tiny bit better for you than the ones found in certain well-known eateries and cafes. Nutritional content aside, these scones were gone in a flash–consumed by taste testers eager to have one (or two) with coffee and tea.

If you can’t find cinnamon baking chips, these would still be nice with white chocolate chips  (or a mix of white and dark chocolate chips) as a substitute.

Cinnamon Chip Scones

1 tbsp. white vinegar
almost 1 c. skim milk
2-1/4 c. all-purpose flour
1 c. whole wheat flour
1/3 c. dark brown sugar
2 tsp. cinnamon
2-1/2 tsp. baking powder
1/2 tsp. baking soda
1/2 tsp. salt
3/4 c. cold butter, cubed
1 (10-oz.) pkg. cinnamon baking chips
2 tbsp. white sugar
2 tbsp. butter, melted

Preparation

1. Spray a large baking sheet (or 2 smaller ones) with baking spray — or lightly grease and flour the sheet(s).

2. Put the tablespoon of vinegar into a 2-cup measuring cup, then add enough skim milk to the vinegar to yield 1 cup total. Set the mixture aside. This is the equivalent of do-it-yourself buttermilk. (If you have buttermilk at hand, however, feel free to use 1 c. buttermilk instead.)

3. In a large bowl, combine the flours, brown sugar, cinnamon, baking powder, baking soda, and salt. Add the butter and cut in with a knife or pastry blender (or, with very clean hands, pinch the cubes of butter/margarine quickly between your fingers, incorporating into flour mixture until the mixture resembles coarse crumbs). Stir in vinegar/milk mixture just until moistened. Fold in chips.

4. Knead the dough gently in the bowl until it is no longer sticky. Divide the dough in half and shape each half into a ball. On a lightly floured surface, gently pat each ball into a 1.5 or 2-inch-thick circle. Cut each circle into 6 wedges, separate the wedges, and place them on the baking sheet(s), with sufficient space between them for expansion. Brush the wedges with melted butter and sprinkle with the 2 tbsp. white sugar.

5. Bake at 425° for 10-15 minutes or until lightly browned. The scones are great warm, but I love them at room temperature, when the cinnamon chips regain their texture.

Adapted from a Taste of Home recipe.

Recipe: Cinnamon Hazelnut Biscotti with Chocolate

29 Oct

So, what do you do when 1) a hurricane is approaching, 2) you are as prepared as you can possibly be (if that’s possible), 3) you still have power but probably won’t have it for long, and 4) family members are getting a bit restless from the enforced confinement? I bake.

In my mind, biscotti are a food that will keep well and provide comfort under any circumstances. And, I happened to have all ingredients on hand, though our supply of dark chocolate chips was suspiciously low and I had to make do with a few sprinkled in mostly for effect. Had I had more, I might have considered melting some and dipping one end of each baked biscotti in chocolate, to get us through the next few days. However, my husband is happy to have a small reprieve from the chocolaty baked goods produced at our house, and is delighted with this pared-down version. Note: I baked these twice, as is traditional for crisp biscotti (biscotti means “twice cooked/baked” in Italian), but these are also lovely soft–just omit the second baking.

Enjoy these with tea or coffee any time–not just when a Frankenstorm is on its way.

Cinnamon Hazelnut Biscotti
Makes about 32 biscotti

1 c. sugar
1 c. packed dark brown sugar
¼ c. toasted hazelnuts (I used chopped; whole would be nice, too)
¼ c. toasted almonds (I used sliced; whole or slivered would be fine)
¼ c. dark chocolate chips
1/3 c. canola oil
2 tsp. cinnamon (3 tsp. if you really like cinnamon; we do)
2 tsp. water
2 tsp. vanilla
2 large eggs, beaten
2 1/2 c. all-purpose (or unbleached) flour
2  tsp.  baking powder
cooking spray

Preparation
1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Spray two large baking sheets with cooking spray.
2. Combine first 10 ingredients in a large bowl; mix well. In a small bowl, stir flour and baking powder together; add to sugar mixture, stirring until well combined and a soft dough forms. Divide dough into four pieces.
3. Using clean hands, shape each piece of dough into a 3/4″ -thick rectangle. Place two rectangles of dough on each baking sheet, pressing into shape as needed.  Bake 20 minutes. Remove from oven, but do not turn oven off.
4. Cut each rectangle diagonally into 3/4″ slices (cut straight on the baking sheet). Spread the slices out a bit on the baking sheet, and bake again for about 10 minutes, or until golden.
5. Let cool 10 minutes before serving.

Recipe: Lamb Kafta Kabobs

8 Sep

In the United States, we tend to use cinnamon mostly in sweet dishes. But in other parts of the world, cinnamon has long been used in savory dishes, too, where it adds an extra layer of flavor and warmth. It is an ancient aromatic spice that was worth more than gold and was considered an appropriate gift for royalty.

These lamb kafta kabobs, which feature the traditional Lebanese flavor combination of cinnamon and allspice,  will make anyone who eats them feel like royalty, too. At our house, we put them in pita bread with hummus (and/or plain yogurt mixed with diced cucumber, garlic, and mint) and lettuce and tomatoes.  I usually make Tabouli as an accompaniment, and some of  us also add that to our pitas for a full flavor experience.

The traditional method of preparation involves shaping the kabobs around a skewer, but it is far easier (and faster) to make them without the skewer. If using wooden skewers, soak them in water for 30 minutes before assembling the kabobs.

Lamb Kafta Kabobs
Serves 4

1 lb. ground lamb (can use half lean ground beef if preferable)
1 small onion, finely chopped
1/2 c. finely chopped parsley
3/4-1 tsp. salt
1/4 tsp. pepper
1/4 tsp. cinnamon
1/8 tsp. allspice

Preparation
1. Mix all ingredients well.
2. Take a small handful of the meat mixture and mold into a roughly 4 ” cylindrical shape around a skewer, or just mold into cylindrical shape without the skewer.
3. Grill and enjoy.

Source: Lebanese Cuisine by Madelain Farah